Differentiated Instruction: Engaging Students at a Whole New Level

Differentiated instruction provides insight into the students’ level of engagement with the subject.  For example, one student from my Algebra II class had struggled with the material covered during the first semester. Her scores on tests and quizzes ranged from 60% to 80%. She submitted most of her homework. When I spoke to the student, she said that she wanted to understand the material better, but she did not know how to study. We tried several methods, and nothing worked. I investigated further and discovered that she really loved creating art on the computer. So, I introduced her to several programs online (e.g. Blender , Desmos, and Scratch by MIT) that she could use to explore three-dimensional modeling. She got excited and started working on them instantly. After a week, she found herself struggling to make some of the objects the right size or place them in the right position. That is when I introduced her to the mathematics used in three-dimensional modeling. Instantly, she wanted to learn as much as she could about graphing two- and three-dimensional equations. What I learned from this experience was that engagement is crucial to the learning process. The only way that this could have been this successful was by consistently engaging the student using the methods listed above. By working closely with students and helping them explore the material in their own way (i.e. differentiated learning), we can facilitate the learning process more effectively.


Scratch (logo)Scratch is a free programming language where you can create your own interactive stories, games, and animations.

Desmos (logo)Graph functions, plot tables of data, evaluate equations, explore transformations, and much more – for free!

Blender (logo 2)Blender is a professional free and open-source 3D computer graphics software product used for creating animations.

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